Virtual Impact Factor

Here’s a short list with websites and places on the internet where Psychology Corner or Lucia Grosaru have been cited or mentioned.

Feel free to tell us if you know any other source of citation.

Thank you!

Platforma: Cambridge.org

Author: Dr Loretta Graziano Breuning
Blog: Your Neurochemical Self
Platform: Psychology Today

“A child, especially a female that is going to pay so much attention to her looks and that knows she is being assessed for it, is very prone to develop eating disorders such as anorexia or bulimia,” said psychotherapist and clinical psychologist, Lucia Grosaru. She also said these pageants can cause hysteric behaviors and anxiety.

* The same article is re-posted on Daily Buzz (US).

“Is this ethical? Psychologist Lucia Grosaru believes there are risks for children competing in these pageants, psychological and physical. On the website, Psychology Corner, Grosaru explains that the pageants exert heavy pressure and put the child on an “emotional rollercoaster,” and if not coped with properly can turn into eating and/or dissociative disorders later on.

Another problem is pageants, as she mentions, “…may attract unwanted public, such as pedophiles.” She goes on, looking into the psyche of the parents. “Mothers of these children are usually trying to live their own dreams through their young daughters. I am talking about dreams that they either could not accomplish or accomplished in such way that they’ve become a way of life,” says Grosaru. To read the full story, go to: Psychologycorner.com.

“According to clinical psychologist Lucia Grosaru, the type of interaction is “dissimulation as a form of interaction, which can be used outside contests too and become a habit.” “

“Grosaru went on to say that while psychological problems can persist long after a child has dedicated the hours necessary to prepare and perform in a beauty contest, an encouragement to compete, spend time with mom and to be dedicated to a hobby are healthy aspects of beauty contests. She warned, however, that “serious psychological problems are just around the corner.” “

*My name is misspelled as Grasaru in this article, but I don’t complain.

““A child, especially a female who is going to pay so much attention to her looks and knows she is being assessed for it, is very prone to develop eating disorders, such as anorexia or bulimia,” Lucia Grosaru, clinical psychologist and president of the Romanian Institute “Sic Cogito,” said.”

  • Veracity Stew – Botox to a Child: The Destruction of Female Self-Esteem, 12.05.2011

Lucia Grosaru at Psychology Corner points out:

These contests promote physical beauty as a main value, complimented of course by the “special talent” and “warm hearts.” A child, especially a female that is going to pay so much attention to her looks and that knows she is being assessed for it, is very prone to develop eating disorders, such as anorexia or bulimia. Also, paranoid features can occur as a response to the “no other girl is your friend here” speech, regarding the relationships between the participants (both mothers and daughters), usually all smiles and hugs at the surface but opposition can be sensed at a deeper level.

Grosaru also makes an important point about the mothers in this, which I couldn’t agree with more:

Mothers of these children are usually trying to live their own dreams through their young daughters. I am talking about dreams that they either could not accomplish or accomplished in such way that they’ve become a way of life. Playing dress-up with your daughter can be great, but why transform it into a full-time job?

“Also, according to Lucia Grosaru, a clinical psychologist and integrative psychotherapist, “Mothers of these children are usually trying to live their own dreams through their young daughters” (Grosaru 1). “

“Lucia Grosaru again states that “anxiety and frustration are near these children at all times. These and many other psychological problems can emerge from having to be something that you are not at a very early age” (Grosaru 1). “

“Lucia Grosaru, a psychologist wrote that, “These contests promote physical beauty as a main value.” “

“Grosaru also went on to state that, “A child, especially a female that is going to pay extra attention to her looks and that knows she is being assessed for it, is very prone to developing an eating disorder.“

“Lucia Grosaru also states that these pageants allow girls and their parents to use an overly excessive amount of “make-up, hair extensions, teased hairstyles, clouds of hairspray, flippers (fake teeth), [and] sophisticated costumes.” “

“Clinical psychologist Lucia Grosaru also states that “these contests promote physical beauty as a main value…A child, especially a female that is going to pay so much attention to her looks …is very prone to develop eating disorders such as anorexia or bulimia.” “

“This blog, written by a clinical psychologist, examines child beauty pageants and the motives behind the parents’ decisions to enter their children into the afore-mentioned contests. Grosaru believes that mothers are just trying to live through their daughters. She argues that these kids should be free to make their own decisions and not have to make their mothers’ dreams come true.”

* I’m not a physiologist, but hey, at least my name’s spelled right.

“Lucia Grosaru, a clinical psychologist, states, “paranoid features can occur as a response to the ‘no other girl is your friend here’ speech, regarding the relationships between the.. Read more here.”

“The following are links to two interesting articles on the subject by psychologist Lucia Grosaru.

Toddlers and children beauty pageants – Risk factors for severe psychological turmoils
Sexualizing your child is not playing dress-up – Parents and child beauty pageants

I think this sums up the whole logic behind it.
Mothers of these children are usually trying to live their own dreams through their young daughters. I am talking about dreams that they either could not accomplish or accomplished in such way that they’ve become a way of life.
(Lucia Grosaru – Toddlers and children beauty pageants – Risk factors for severe psychological turmoils)”

Psychology Corner – Blog by a Romanian clinical psychologist and psychotherapist Lucia Grosaru. I’d like to see more updates and more coverage of scientific articles, but popular articles like: “Toddlers and children beauty pageants – Risk factors for severe psychological turmoils” and “10 (Psychological) Reasons why we like Dexter Morgan” engages people and gets them commenting in a way I haven’t managed to.

“For many years, pageants have left many people questioning the motives and actions of the pageants for young girls. As shown by example in the article I read by clinical psychologist Lucia Grosaru, the questions and concerns mostly revolve around,

“Make-up, hair extensions, teased hairstyles, clouds of hairspray, flippers (fake teeth), sophisticated costumes, screaming crowds (mostly mothers), weird postures, twitched face expressions, tiaras, trophies, money and more or less talent are the ingredients for the usual children beauty pageants, along with exercised smiles and hysterical crying and outbursts.”

Grosaru goes on to say that the little girls and their mothers are usually in it for one reason; to win gold for the prize money and the tiara. She also writes about how the little girls are somewhat forced into the pageant world by their mothers as they register and train them without their request.”

[..]

“I thought it was very interesting seeing what an actual psychologist thought of child beauty pageants. Grosaru asks,

“What can a child learn by being a professional/serial beauty pageant contestant? Well, encouraging the sense of competition is okay, having a hobby to be dedicated to is okay, spending time with mom is great, but when you become a winning machine, a 1st place chaser or a tiara collector, serious psychological problems are just around the corner.”

            Grosaru brings up three main psychological problems that may occur in little girls who consistently participate in such beauty pageants. The first once being the self-conscious eating disorders such as anorexia nervosa or bulimia brought about from always being assessed by outer appearance. The second problem she explains is one of being paranoid about who the true friends are. I was never in pageants, but I was in competitive figure skating and many times I got the talk Grosaru explains as the “no other girl is your friend here” speech. I have first hand experience in that, and yes, it can lead to some paranoia; especially when the surface is filed with hugs and smiles. The last major problem Grosaru brought was, “dissimulation as a form of interaction.”  Dissimulation, according to Wikipedia, is a form of deception in which one conceals the truth. I can see how this may lead to other problems as the girls grow and learn more about the life around them.”

  • ›Pageants – Are They as Harmless as They Seem? (School Project); Danielle Berninzoni, Andrea Hoos, Kaylee Kennedy, and Kaitlyn Wong

* Thank you, girls, for the PowerPoint presentation! It was awesome.